Authors

Hermann Stefánsson

Hermann Stefánsson was born in Reykjavík on July 25th 1968. In 1994 he graduated with a B.A. degree in comparative literature and Icelandic from The University of Iceland, and in 2001 he received a master's degree in comparative literature from the same university. Hermann finished parts of his studies in Spain, as he has lived there and in Galicia on and off for years.

Hermann has worked as a freelance academic and translator with the ReykjavíkAcademy, an editor for the webzine Kistan and a critic for Morgunblaðið daily newspaper, as well as writing numerous columns and articles for Lesbókin (Morgunblaðið's weekly cultural supplement), The National Radio and Kistan. He has also written scholarly articles and short stories for various publications, been a part-time teacher at The University of Iceland and a copy editor for the publishers Hávallaútgáfan and Bjartur. Hermann is also a musician, having written songs and lyrics on records released by himself, his band 5ta herdeildin and with his brother Jón Hallur Stefánsson.

Hermann's first book, Sjónhverfingar (Illusions), was published by Bjartur in 2003 and described as a poetic non-fiction work. A year later his short story collection Níu þjófalyklar (Nine Thief's Keys) was published, and since then Hermann has written the novel Stefnuljós (Turn Signal), the poetry collection Borg í þoku (A City in Fog) and a few radio plays. His latest works are the novel Algleymi (Euphoria), published in 2008 and the poetry book Högg á vatni (Blows on Water) from 2009. Hermann has translated the works of foreign authors such as Juan José Millás, Manuel Rivas, José Carlos Somoza and Zizou Corder into Icelandic, and has also translated Icelandic poems into Galician, which were published in the collection Auroras Boreais. Escolma de poesía Islandesa.

Hermann Stefánsson lives in Reykjavík with his common law wife and three children.

Publisher: Bjartur.


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